Washington InfoboxF.PNG

The 2016 United States presidential election in Washington took place on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 United States presidential election. Washington voters chose twelve representatives, or electors, to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice-President.

Washington was won by incumbent President Henry T. Ferguson (D-Texas), with 61.97% of the popular vote, against Senator William H. Pryor, Jr. (R-Alabama), with 37.37% of the popular vote.

Analysis[edit | edit source]

Washington once leaned Republican, like most of the Pacific Northwest. From 1952 to 1984, it only went Democratic twice-in 1964 and 1968. However, it has become much more friendly to the Democrats since 1988, voting Republican only in 1992 and in 2008. In the latter year, Mitt Romney had won the state by a decisive margin-9.64%-against Dennis Kucinich. Nevertheless, even in that year, the state was 2.82% more Democratic than the national average. And in 2012, Washington had swung decisively against Romney, going to Henry T. Ferguson with 56.08% of the popular vote.

Like Oregon, the state is divided politically by the urban/rural divide and geographically by the Cascade Mountains. The two are related in that nearly all of the major cities lie west of the Cascades. Most of the state's population resides in Western Washington along the Pacific Coast and in highly urbanized areas like Seattle. The Seattle area, home to almost two-thirds of the state's population, is overwhelmingly Democratic. The rest of Western Washington leans Democratic as well, though the lean is not as pronounced as in the greater Seattle area. By contrast, Eastern Washington is very rural, and in many ways more similar to Idaho than Seattle. Republicans have had an edge here for many years, in part due to its strong tinge of social conservatism. As a result, while Republicans typically win more counties, the overwhelming Democratic trend in the more heavily-populated western portion is enough to swing the whole state to the Democrats.

On Election Day, Ferguson won the state by 24.60%. The President carried King County, home to Seattle itself and its close suburbs and just over a third of the state population, with 68% of the vote-half of his statewide majority. Ferguson won the next two largest counties in Western Washington, Pierce (home to Tacoma) and Snohomish (home to Everett) with over 60% of the vote. His combined majority in King, Pierce, and Snohomish counties-558,392 votes-would have been more than enough to carry the state. But Ferguson won the majority of Washington's thirty-nine counties, carrying all but six of them. He became the first Democrat since Johnson in 1964 to win Eastern Washington, carrying Whitman County, home to Washington State University in Pullam, and Spokane County, the region's largest county, home to the city of Spokane, by double-digit margins. And in two counties-Jefferson and San Juan-the President received more than 70% of the vote. The most populous county carried by Pryor was Benton County, home to Kennewick, which he won by a 4.45% margin.

During the same election, incumbent Democratic Governor Jay Inslee was reelected to a second term with 59.39% of the vote over Republican Bill Bryant, who took 40.11% of the popular vote. And incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Patty Murray won her fifth term against Republican Chris Vance, earning 59.01% of the vote to Vance's 40.99%. At the state level, Democrats picked up one seat in the Washington House of Representatives while Republicans picked up a seat in the Washington Senate.

Results[edit | edit source]

2016 United States presidential election in Washington
Party Candidate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic (inc.) Henry T. Ferguson 2,055,542 61.97% 12
Republican William H. Pryor, Jr. 1,239,561 37.37% 0
Libertarian Sam Sloan 20,566 0.62% 0
Green Jill Stein 1,350 0.04% 0
Totals 3,317,019 100.00% 12

Results by county[edit | edit source]

County Henry Thomas Ferguson
Democratic
William Holcombe Pryor, Jr.
Republican
Various candidates
Other parties
Margin Total votes cast
# % # % # % # %
Adams 2,185 45.70% 2,591 54.17% 6 0.13% -406 -8.47% 4,782
Asotin 5,751 57.66% 4,219 42.30% 4 0.04% 1,532 15.36% 9,974
Benton 39,915 47.75% 43,637 52.20% 40 0.05% -3,722 -4.45% 83,592
Chelan 17,423 50.60% 16,783 48.74% 227 0.66% 640 1.86% 34,433
Clallam 23,987 59.18% 16,503 40.71% 43 0.11% 7,484 18.47% 40,533
Clark 130,926 62.80% 76,838 36.85% 721 0.35% 54,088 25.95% 208,485
Columbia 989 44.36% 1,239 55.60% 1 0.04% -250 -11.24% 2,229
Cowlitz 31,302 66.40% 15,493 32.86% 347 0.74% 15,809 33.54% 47,142
Douglas 7,782 48.94% 8,108 50.99% 11 0.07% -326 -2.05% 15,901
Ferry 2,008 55.11% 1,631 44.75% 5 0.14% 377 10.36% 3,644
Franklin 12,642 51.36% 11,811 47.99% 161 0.65% 831 3.37% 24,614
Garfield 547 43.22% 719 56.78% 0 0.00% -172 -13.56% 1,266
Grant 15,059 51.47% 14,179 48.46% 20 0.07% 880 3.01% 29,258
Grays Harbor 17,622 60.14% 11,509 39.28% 170 0.58% 6,113 20.86% 29,301
Island 25,182 56.88% 19,040 43.00% 51 0.12% 6,142 13.88% 44,273
Jefferson 14,665 70.24% 6,159 29.50% 55 0.26% 8,506 40.74% 20,879
King 709,205 68.96% 308,584 30.00% 10,684 1.04% 400,621 38.96% 1,028,473
Kitsap 78,833 61.22% 49,576 38.50% 361 0.28% 29,257 22.72% 128,770
Kittitas 10,463 53.34% 9,131 46.55% 21 0.11% 1,332 6.79% 19,615
Klickitat 6,700 63.21% 4,364 36.70% 10 0.09% 2,336 26.51% 11,074
Lewis 17,888 50.82% 17,277 49.08% 34 0.10% 611 1.74% 35,199
Lincoln 2,676 45.66% 3,182 54.29% 3 0.05% -506 -8.63% 5,861
Mason 16,749 57.75% 12,226 42.15% 28 0.10% 4,523 15.60% 29,003
Okanogan 10,130 57.70% 7,409 42.20% 17 0.10% 2,721 15.50% 17,556
Pacific 7,389 67.34% 3,559 32.44% 24 0.22% 3,830 34.90% 10,972
Pend Oreille 3,841 54.74% 3,171 45.20% 4 0.06% 670 9.54% 7,016
Pierce 220,438 61.23% 136,164 37.82% 3,415 0.95% 84,274 23.41% 360,017
San Juan 8,208 73.72% 2,895 26.00% 31 0.28% 5,313 47.72% 11,134
Skagit 33,726 58.09% 24,260 41.78% 73 0.13% 9,466 16.31% 58,059
Skamania 3,760 64.51% 2,062 35.37% 7 0.12% 1,698 29.14% 5,829
Snohomish 213,089 60.07% 139,592 39.35% 2,053 0.58% 73,497 20.72% 354,734
Spokane 133,132 56.40% 101,406 42.96% 1,512 0.64% 31,726 13.44% 236,050
Stevens 11,962 51.13% 11,404 48.75% 29 0.12% 558 2.38% 23,395
Thurston 79,200 59.45% 54,551 40.22% 440 0.33% 24,649 19.23% 134,191
Wahkiakum 1,487 61.20% 938 38.64% 4 0.16% 549 22.56% 2,429
Walla Walla 13,130 50.06% 13,083 49.88% 15 0.06% 47 0.18% 26,228
Whatcom 73,081 64.48% 39,490 34.84% 768 0.68% 33,591 29.64% 113,339
Whitman 10,638 59.01% 7,374 40.90% 16 0.09% 3,264 18.11% 18,028
Yakima 41,832 52.46% 37,404 46.91% 505 0.63% 4,428 5.55% 79,741
Totals 2,055,542 61.97% 1,239,561 37.37% 21,916 0.66% 815,981 24.60% 3,317,019

By congressional district[edit | edit source]

Ferguson carried all ten congressional districts, including two represented by a Republican.

District Ferguson Pryor Representative
1st 58% 41% Suzan DelBene
2nd 63% 37% Rick Larsen
3rd 62% 38% Brian Baird
4th 51% 49% Dan Newhouse
5th 56% 44% Joseph Pakootas
6th 64% 35% Derek Kilmer
7th 81% 19% Jim McDermott
Pramila Jayapal
8th 51% 48% Dave Reichert
9th 68% 31% Adam Smith
10th 60% 40% Dennis Heck

Counties that swung from Republican to Democratic[edit | edit source]

  • Chelan (largest city: Wenatchee)
  • Ferry (largest city: Republic)
  • Franklin (largest city: Pasco)
  • Grant (largest city: Moses Lake)
  • Kittitas (largest city: Ellensburg)
  • Lewis (largest city: Centralia)
  • Pend Oreille (largest city: Newport)
  • Stevens (largest city: Colville)
  • Yakima (largest city: Yakima)
  • Walla Walla (largest city: Walla Walla)
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