Vermont InfoboxF.PNG

The 2016 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 United States Presidential Election which was held throughout all fifty states and the District of Columbia. Voters chose three representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice-President.

Vermont voted overwhelmingly for the Democratic nominee, incumbent President Henry T. Ferguson of Texas, over the Republican nominee, Senator William H. Pryor, Jr. of Alabama. Ferguson ran with Vice-President Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, while Pryor's running mate was Congressman Paul Ryan of Wisconsin.

Ferguson won a landslide in Vermont with 66.30% of the vote to Pryor's 33.69%, a Democratic victory margin of 32.61%.

Vermont weighed in as ten percent more Democratic than the national average. Vermont was historically a bastion of liberal Northeastern Republicanism, and from 1856 to 1964, the Green Mountain State went Republican in every presidential election during that period. But in 1964, the nomination of staunch conservative Barry Goldwater by the GOP alienated the state's electorate, and it consequently went for Lyndon B. Johnson in a landslide, the first time it ever voted Democratic. After 1964, Vermont reverted to the Republican Party through the 1992 election, although in 1980, 1984, 1988, and 1992, it was more Democratic than the national average.

Ultimately, the state flipped to the Democrats in 1996, with Mario Cuomo, and subsequently voted Democratic in 2000 and 2004. Mitt Romney, then the Governor of Massachusetts, decisively won Vermont in 2008, carrying it by 18% against Democratic nominee Dennis Kucinich. In 2012, however, Vermont snapped back to the Democrats, as Governor Ferguson of Texas won it by 20% against Romney, whose popularity in New England had collapsed during his term in office. And in 2016, the nomination of arch-conservative Alabama Senator William Pryor was received very negatively by the state's electorate. Portrayed as a warmonger who would carpet-bomb the Middle East by the Ferguson campaign, Pryor was viewed as deeply out of step by the liberal Northeast. Ferguson consequently won every state in the region with landslides of over sixty percent of the vote, including Vermont, which weighed in as the tenth most Democratic state in the nation.

Ferguson swept all fourteen counties in Vermont, breaking 60% of the vote in eleven of them. He broke 70% in three counties: Chittenden County, the most populous county, home to the state's largest city Burlington, Washington County, and Windham County. Pryor's best county in the state was Essex County, which he lost by a 54%-46% margin to Ferguson; Essex County had been the only county in the state to vote for Romney in 2012. Vermont was one of twelve states where Ferguson won every county.

Results[edit | edit source]

2016 United States presidential election in Vermont
Party Candidate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic (inc.) Henry T. Ferguson 208,889 66.30% 3
Republican William H. Pryor, Jr. 106,146 33.69% 0
No party Write-ins 32 0.01% 0
Totals 315,067 100.00% 3

Results by county[edit | edit source]

County Henry Thomas Ferguson
Democratic
William Holcombe Pryor, Jr.
Republican
Various candidates
Other parties
Margin Total votes cast
# % # % # % # %
Addison 13,040 68.52% 5,991 31.48% 7,049 37.04% 19,031
Bennington 11,319 65.12% 6,062 34.88% 5,257 30.24% 17,381
Caledonia 8,164 58.01% 5,910 41.99% 2,254 16.02% 14,074
Chittenden 58,541 70.18% 24,875 29.82% 33,666 40.36% 83,416
Essex 1,580 54.03% 1,345 45.97% 235 8.06% 2,925
Franklin 13,384 62.51% 8,023 37.47% 4 0.02% 5,361 25.04% 21,411
Grand Isle 2,568 62.49% 1,538 37.44% 3 0.07% 1,030 25.05% 4,109
Lamoille 8,678 68.00% 4,084 32.00% 4,594 36.00% 12,762
Orange 9,352 63.84% 5,294 36.14% 3 0.02% 4,058 27.70% 14,649
Orleans 7,502 62.28% 4,544 37.72% 2,958 24.56% 12,046
Rutland 16,978 57.33% 12,637 42.67% 4,341 14.66% 29,615
Washington 21,811 70.16% 9,263 29.81% 12 0.03% 12,548 40.35% 31,086
Windham 16,136 71.29% 6,491 28.68% 7 0.03% 9,645 42.61% 22,634
Windsor 19,836 66.28% 10,089 33.71% 3 0.01% 9,747 32.57% 29,928
Totals 208,889 66.30% 106,146 33.69% 32 0.01% 102,743 32.61% 315,067

By congressional district[edit | edit source]

Due to the state's low population, only one congressional district is allocated. This district is called the At-Large district, because it covers the entire state, and thus is equivalent to the statewide election results.

District Ferguson Pryor Representative
At-large 66.3% 33.7% Peter Welch

Counties that swung from Republican to Democratic[edit | edit source]

  • Essex (largest town: Lunenburg)
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