Ferguson Electoral Infobox.PNG

The 2016 United States presidential election was the 58th quadrennial presidential election. It was held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016. Incumbent Democratic President Henry T. Ferguson defeated William H. Pryor Jr., the Republican nominee. With 61.1% of the popular vote, Ferguson won the largest share of the popular vote of any candidate since the largely uncontested 1820 election.

Ferguson took office in January 2013, after defeating his Republican predecessor, Mitt Romney, in the 2012 election. He ran unopposed for the Democratic presidential nomination, and once again tapped sitting Vice President Amy Klobuchar as his running mate. Senator William H. Pryor, Jr. of Alabama, one of the most conservative Republicans in the United States Senate, defeated moderate Governor Jon M. Huntsman of Utah and Governor John Kasich of Ohio for the Republican presidential nomination.

Ferguson, who had successfully navigated the country through economic recovery and had overseen the resolution of American conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, enjoyed high approval ratings by the time of the election. Ferguson also advocated a series of programs known as the New Hope, addressing immigration, infrastructure, education, and healthcare. Pryor, on his part, called for privatizing Social Security and opposed the New Hope. Democrats successfully portrayed Pryor as a dangerous extremist, most famously in the "Pryor's America" television advertisement. The Republican Party was divided between its moderate and conservative factions, with Huntsman and other moderate party leaders refusing to campaign for Pryor. Ferguson led by wide margins in all public opinion polls throughout the campaign.

Ferguson carried 46 states and the District of Columbia. Pryor won his home state and three other adjacent states in the Deep South-Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, which have been Republican strongholds in recent decades. Ferguson's landslide victory coincided with the defeat of many conservative Republican Congressmen. The subsequent 115th Congress would pass major legislation such as the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2017 and the Voting Rights Amendments. At 75, Ferguson was the oldest person ever to be nominated by a major party and elected as President.

Nominations

Democratic Party

Primaries

With the advantage of incumbency, Henry Ferguson's path to renomination by the Democratic Party was uneventful. The nomination process consisted of primaries and caucuses, held by the 50 states, as well as Guam, Puerto Rico, Washington D.C., U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and Democrats Abroad. Additionally, high-ranking party members known as superdelegates each received one vote in the convention. Running unopposed everywhere, President Ferguson cemented his status as the Democratic presumptive nominee on April 5, 2016, by securing the minimum number of pledged delegates needed to win the nomination.

Nominees

Ferguson-Klobuchar Box.PNG

Republican Party

Primaries

The Republican Party's nomination process in 2016 was dominated by a civil war between its moderate and conservative factions. Former Vice-President John E. Sununu, who had been on the losing Republican presidential ticket in 2012, decided not to run. Sununu, a moderate with ties to both wings of the GOP, would have been able to unite the party's factions. In his absence, other candidates emerged. Alabama Senator William H. Pryor, Jr., a political firebrand who had become a leader of the Party's conservative faction, emerged as that wing's primary candidate for the Presidency. He was opposed for the Republican nomination by Governor Jon M. Huntsman of Utah, who had long been a leader of the Party's moderate faction.

Governor John Kasich of Ohio, another prominent member of the Party's moderate faction, also ran for the nomination, as did South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, former Virginia Governor Jim Gilmore, former New York Governor George Pataki, businesswoman Carly Fiorina, former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum, and physician Ben Carson, the latter two of whom were also conservatives.

Prior to the Iowa caucuses on February 1, 2016, Gilmore, Pataki, and Santorum withdrew due to low polling numbers. The nomination was, from the beginning, primarily a contest between Pryor and Huntsman. Pryor, who had been the favorite in Iowa polls prior to the caucuses, posted a strong performance there, capturing most of the delegates. Huntsman subsequently won the New Hampshire primary, in the aftermath of which Graham dropped out. Nevertheless, the momentum lay with Pryor. On March 1, 2016, the first of the "Super Tuesday" primaries were held, with Huntsman prevailing only in Minnesota and Alaska, and Pryor sweeping the remaining nine states that voted. Failing to gain traction, Carson suspended his campaign a few days later. On March 15, 2016, the second "Super Tuesday", Kasich won only the contest in his home state of Ohio, and Pryor won five primaries, including Florida. Fiorina dropped out at this stage.

Between March 16 and May 3, 2016, only three candidates remained in the race: Pryor, Huntsman, and Kasich. Huntsman won the contests in his home state of Utah, and in other Western states including the Dakotas, Idaho, Wyoming, and Arizona. Ultimately, however, he was unable to overcome the Pryor margins in states such as Wisconsin and Indiana, and on May 3, 2016, formally suspended his campaign. Kasich also ended his bid at that point in time. Shortly afterwards, Pryor was proclaimed to be the presumptive nominee by the chairman of the Republican National Committee (RNC), Reince Priebus.

Pryor subsequently selected Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan, who had gained notice as a deficit hawk in the House, as his running mate. Ryan's selection surprised many, as it was not thought to bring any discernible advantages to the ticket. Nevertheless, he won the Republican vice presidential nomination by acclamation on June 19 at the 2016 Republican National Convention, held in Cleveland, Ohio.

Nominees

Pryor-Ryan Box.PNG

Withdrawn candidates

  • Jon Huntsman, Governor of Utah (withdrew on May 3, 2016; refused to endorse Pryor)
  • John Kasich, Governor of Ohio (withdrew on May 3, 2016; refused to endorse Pryor)
  • Carly Fiorina, former CEO of Hewlett-Packard (withdrew on March 15, 2016; declined to endorse a candidate)
  • Ben Carson, surgeon (withdrew on March 5, 2016; declined to endorse a candidate, then endorsed Pryor)
  • Lindsey Graham, Senator from South Carolina (withdrew on February 17, 2016; endorsed Pryor)
  • George Pataki, former Governor of New York (withdrew on December 29, 2015; declined to endorse a candidate)
  • Jim Gilmore, former Governor of Virginia (withdrew on December 21, 2015; endorsed Pryor)
  • Rick Santorum, former Senator from Pennsylvania (withdrew on November 17, 2015; endorsed Pryor)

Gallery of Candidates.PNG

Other candidates

Libertarian Party candidate Sam Sloan received 138,546 popular votes (0.10%). Sloan, a chess player and publisher, had previously ran for the Libertarian presidential nomination in 2012, but lost to former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson. He had also run for Governor of New York, as an independent, in 2014. His share of the popular vote was a substantial drop from the 0.65% Johnson had received in 2012.

Jill Stein of the Green Party took 55,825 popular votes (0.04%), while Constitution Party candidate Darrell Castle came in fifth with 29,190 popular votes (0.02%). Write-ins and all other candidates (independents and minor third parties) received the remaining 2,891 popular votes (0.01%). In total, third-party candidates garnered just 0.17% of the national popular vote. This was the smallest the third-party vote had been in any presidential election since 1868. No third-party candidates were on the ballot in twenty states and the District of Columbia.[lower-alpha 1]

General election

Campaign

Pryor was unable to unite the Party's conservative and moderate factions for the general election. The 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, was one of the most contentious and most divisive conventions for that party in recent times, matching that of the 1964 Republican National Convention. A final attempt was mounted by supporters of Huntsman to produce a revolt on the convention floor, aimed at denying Pryor the requisite number of delegates needed to win the nomination. Members of the Colorado and Utah delegations were instrumental to this effort, which was nevertheless suppressed by Priebus and other leading Republican officials. Huntsman himself gave a speech at the Convention, but did not explicitly endorse Pryor and refused to do so when pressed. Kasich refused to attend the Convention at all, and openly expressed his doubts about the viability of the Pryor campaign.

Pryor himself was unable to overcome the difficulties this generated, nor was he able to present an attractive and compelling alternative to the Ferguson campaign. Pryor's controversial comments on aspects of social policy, such as homosexuality, attracted considerable attention, and were given additional light by the Democrats. Moreover, his strong opposition to immigration, healthcare, and education reform was at odds with the opinions of the majority of the American populace. This was further magnified by the fact that his running mate, Ryan, was one of the leading advocates for privatizing Social Security and cutting back on Medicare and Medicaid entitlements, policies which Pryor supported. Ferguson, who presented himself as a tireless advocate for the working class, and advanced a series of policy proposals known as the New Hope, criticized his Republican opponents for these stances.

Moreover, capitalizing on Pryor's remarks on social policy, and upon war-he called for a "carpet bombing campaign" against terrorist cells throughout the Middle East-Ferguson was able to paint Pryor as a dangerous extremist, suggesting that his administration would reverse the progress of recent years. This message was amplified through a series of television advertisements, most notably the "Pryor's America" ad, among the most famous such ads in American political history. Ferguson also vastly outspent Pryor and was represented well on the campaign trail by Vice-President Klobuchar.

Ferguson led Pryor in all public opinion polls by wide margins throughout the entire campaign.

Results

Election results by county.

  Henry T. Ferguson
  William H. Pryor

The election was held on November 8, 2016. President Ferguson won in a landslide, carrying 46 states and the District of Columbia with 497 electoral votes, to Pryor's 4 states and one congressional district with 41 electoral votes.[lower-alpha 2] Ferguson won the greatest amount of electoral votes earned by any Democratic presidential candidate since Franklin D. Roosevelt had earned 523 votes in 1936. He carried 8 of Romney's 12 states from 2012 and held all 38 states which he had won that year. The amount of party switching was substantial. Idaho, Indiana, Utah, and Wyoming all went Democratic for the first time since 1964, when they had been carried by Lyndon B. Johnson over Barry Goldwater. The pro-Ferguson shift in Idaho and Utah was particularly notable, as they had been among the best Republican states in the country in every election from 1976 to 2012; Pryor's perceived Anti-Mormonist views were believed to be the primary factor in their defection to the Democrats.

Results by congressional district.

Ferguson also became only the second Democrat since 1964, following Al Gore in 2004, to carry the historically Republican states of Kansas and Nebraska on the Great Plains. These states were motivated by concerns over Pryor's energy, agricultural, and environmental policies, which they viewed as a threat to their livelihoods. New England decisively rejected Pryor, as he became the first Republican presidential candidate in history to not win a single county in the region. In twelve states, Pryor failed to carry a single county;[lower-alpha 3]he carried a mere one county in a further three states;[lower-alpha 4]and just two counties in one other state.[lower-alpha 5] Nearly seven hundred counties switched from Romney to Ferguson, with Ferguson gaining at least one county in all but four states.[lower-alpha 6]

Five counties in three states voted Democratic for the first time in history,[lower-alpha 7] and 311 counties voted Democratic for the first time since Johnson or earlier. This included 11 counties in six states which had last voted Democratic in the nineteenth century. Edwards County, Illinois went Democratic for the first time since 1832, and Boone County, Illinois went Democratic for the first time since 1844. Ferguson was the first Democrat to win Morgan County, West Virginia since 1848-Morgan County had last voted Democratic when it was still part of Virginia. Taney County, Missouri had last backed a Democrat when James Buchanan had won it in 1856. Lewis County, Kentucky last went Democratic in 1876, Wayne County, Pennsylvania had done so in 1892, and Douglas County, Missouri had last supported a Democrat when carried by the Great Commoner, William Jennings Bryan, in 1896. Ferguson also carried 64 counties which had last voted Democratic between 1968 and 1996.[lower-alpha 8]

Ferguson's gains were heaviest in the swing states that he carried, and the President also flipped many counties in other states throughout the Midwest, Northeast, West, and Upper South. Of the 3,143 counties/districts/independent cities making returns, Ferguson won in 2,326 (74.01%) while Pryor carried 817 (25.99%). Ferguson won the most counties carried by any Democratic presidential candidate since Roosevelt in 1936.

Comparing to the last election in which a Republican had received less than 40% of the popular vote (2004), Pryor carried 100 counties in 20 states which had gone for Gore, mainly rural, small-town, or exurban. Moreover, a majority of these counties were located in the South, such as in Georgia, the only state to vote for both Pryor and Gore. Ferguson, on his part, won 637 counties in 42 states which had gone for Smith, many of which were urban or suburban (i.e. Orange County, California, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, and Salt Lake County, Utah), reflecting the more urban orientation of the Ferguson coalition-although it still relied on a considerable amount of Blue Dog and Yellow Dog Democratic support in rural and working-class areas. Nevertheless, Ferguson carried 222 counties that had last gone Democratic for Gore in 2004, and 16 counties in seven states which had last gone Democratic for Gore in 2000.

The only Pryor bright spot was the Deep South, by 2016 the primary bastion of Republican support in the country. Pryor continued the Republican winning streaks in Alabama, Mississippi, and South Carolina which extended back to 1980, and he became only the second losing Republican in history, following Goldwater in 1964, to carry Georgia. Conversely, this made Ferguson the first ever Democrat elected to two terms to fail to win Georgia either time. Alabama, Pryor's home state, was his best state in the country, the only state where he received more than 60% of the popular vote, and one of only two states where he won a higher percentage than Romney had in 2012.[lower-alpha 9] It was also the only state where Pryor won a county that had gone for Ferguson in 2012: Butler County, Alabama. Pryor's local roots, his staunch social conservatism, and his interventionist streak in foreign policy enabled him to retain the support of his native region.

Like New England and the Interior West, the "moderate" Upper South also rejected Pryor, as Florida and Virginia switched from Romney to Ferguson. Ferguson became the first Democrat to win a majority of the popular vote in Florida since Jimmy Carter in 1976 and the first to do so in Virginia since Johnson in 1964. The "loyalist" South, which had gone Democratic in both 2004 and 2012[lower-alpha 10] also stood firm for Ferguson. The South was the only real battleground in 2016, with Ferguson winning 156-40 in the Electoral College and 55% to 45% in the popular vote. Outside the South, the electoral vote margin for Ferguson was 341 to 1. Nationally, he won 61% to 39%, an 6-point gain over his 2012 vote. Ferguson received 66% of the urban vote, 59% of the suburban vote, and 57% of the rural vote.

5 of Ferguson's top 10 states were in New England, which had once been the bastion of Republicanism. Rhode Island, Hawaii, and Massachusetts were the three strongest Ferguson states. Michigan, which was one of the most Republican states in the country a century before, was Ferguson's ninth-best state. Alaska and Vermont were there also, as were Connecticut, Maine, Illinois, New York, and West Virginia. West Virginia was the only Southern state to appear on the Democratic top 10. Six of Pryor's strongest states were in the South[lower-alpha 11], two were in the Mountain West[lower-alpha 12], and two were in the Great Plains[lower-alpha 13].

Following the abnormal turnout decline in 2012, the 2016 election witnessed a substantial rise in the total number of votes cast. The total vote-136,669,237-represented an increase of 7,583,831 over 2012. The most significant increases were recorded in California, Florida, New York, Pennsylvania, and Texas. Nevertheless, turnout did decline in five other states-Hawaii, Iowa, Mississippi, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

The Ferguson landslide defeated many conservative Republican congressmen, giving him a majority that could enact a more progressive agenda.

Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral
vote
Running mate
Count Percentage Vice-presidential candidate Home state Electoral vote
Henry Thomas Ferguson Democratic Texas 83,436,593 61.05% 497 Amy Jean Klobuchar Minnesota 497
William Holcombe Pryor, Jr. Republican Alabama 53,006,195 38.78% 41 Paul Davis Ryan Wisconsin 41
Samuel Howard Sloan Libertarian New York 138,546 0.10% 0 Richard Jason Satawk "R.J." Harris Oklahoma 0
Dr. Jill Ellen Stein Green Massachusetts 55,825 0.04% 0 Ajamu Sibeko Baraka Illinois 0
Darrell Lane Castle Constitution Tennessee 29,190 0.02% 0 Scott N. Bradley Utah 0
Other 2,891 0.01% Other
Total 136,669,237 100% 538 538
Needed to win 270 270
61.05% 38.78% 0.10% 0.04% 0.02% 0.01%
Ferguson Pryor Sloan Stein Castle Others
Popular vote
Ferguson
  
61.05%
Pryor
  
38.78%
Others
  
0.17%
497 41
Ferguson Pryor
Electoral vote—President
Ferguson
  
92.38%
Pryor
  
7.62%
Electoral vote—Vice President
Klobuchar
  
92.38%
Ryan
  
7.62%

Geography of results

States and Pie Chart Map.png

Cartographic gallery

Results by state

States/districts won by Ferguson/Klobuchar
States/districts won by Pryor/Ryan
Henry Ferguson
Democratic
William Pryor
Republican
Sam Sloan
Libertarian
Jill Stein
Green
Darrell Castle
Constitution
Margin State Total
State electoral
votes
# % electoral
votes
# % electoral
votes
# % electoral
votes
# % electoral
votes
# % electoral
votes
# % #
Alabama 9 814,525 38.36 - 1,308,847 61.64 9 - - - - - - - - - -494,322 -23.28 2,123,372 AL
Alaska 3 209,995 65.91 3 108,613 34.09 - - - - - - - - - - 101,382 31.82 318,608 AK
Arizona 11 1,530,261 59.47 11 1,042,904 40.53 - - - - - - - - - - 487,357 18.94 2,573,165 AZ
Arkansas 6 633,833 56.06 6 490,810 43.41 - 5,992 0.53 - - - - - - - 143,023 12.66 1,130,635 AR
California 55 9,173,908 64.69 55 4,993,340 35.21 - 5,673 0.04 - 4,254 0.03 - 2,836 0.02 - 4,180,568 29.48 14,181,595 CA
Colorado 9 1,703,457 61.27 9 1,061,776 38.19 - 9,175 0.33 - 4,726 0.17 - 1,113 0.04 - 641,681 23.08 2,780,247 CO
Connecticut 7 1,115,420 67.81 7 527,855 32.09 - 822 0.05 - 329 0.02 - 164 0.01 - 587,565 35.72 1,644,920 CT
Delaware 3 270,505 60.95 3 172,111 38.78 - 932 0.21 - 266 0.06 - - - - 98,394 22.17 443,814 DE
D.C. 3 287,798 92.46 3 23,470 7.54 - - - - - - - - - - 264,328 84.92 311,268 DC
Florida 29 4,818,350 51.15 29 4,601,689 48.85 - - - - - - - - - - 216,661 2.30 9,420,039 FL
Georgia 16 1,887,428 45.87 - 2,226,893 54.12 16 411 0.01 - - - - - - - -339,465 -8.25 4,114,732 GA
Hawaii 4 337,831 78.76 4 91,106 21.24 - - - - - - - - - - 246,725 57.52 428,937 HI
Idaho 4 351,478 50.92 4 338,777 49.08 - - - - - - - - - - 12,701 1.84 690,255 ID
Illinois 20 3,722,265 67.23 20 1,814,159 32.77 - - - - - - - - - - 1,908,106 34.46 5,536,424 IL
Indiana 11 1,531,029 55.98 11 1,191,348 43.56 - 10,940 0.40 - 1,641 0.06 - - - - 339,681 12.42 2,734,958 IN
Iowa 6 969,060 61.88 6 593,839 37.92 - 2,506 0.16 - 313 0.02 - 157 0.01 - 375,221 23.96 1,566,031 IA
Kansas 6 640,643 54.09 6 533,692 45.06 - 7,462 0.63 - 2,605 0.22 - - - - 106,951 9.03 1,184,402 KS
Kentucky 8 1,231,648 64.01 8 685,959 35.65 - 6,350 0.33 - - - - 192 0.01 - 545,689 28.36 1,924,149 KY
Louisiana 8 1,199,361 59.11 8 827,642 40.79 - 1,623 0.08 203 0.01 203 0.01 - 371,719 18.32 2,029,032 LA
Maine 4 514,574 68.80 4 232,904 31.14 - 150 0.02 - 224 0.03 - 75 0.01 - 281,670 37.66 747,927 ME
Maryland 10 1,821,013 65.47 10 960,433 34.53 - - - - - - - - - - 860,580 30.94 2,781,446 MD
Massachusetts 11 2,533,353 76.19 11 779,391 23.44 - 5,320 0.16 - 6,650 0.20 - 332 0.01 - 1,753,962 52.75 3,325,046 MA
Michigan 16 3,201,122 66.70 16 1,588,563 33.10 - 5,759 0.12 - 2,400 0.05 - 1,440 0.03 - 1,612,537 33.60 4,799,284 MI
Minnesota 10 1,877,881 63.76 10 1,060,284 36.00 - 1,936 0.08 - 4,712 0.16 - - - - 817,597 27.76 2,944,813 MN
Mississippi 6 598,027 49.45 - 610,121 50.45 6 1,209 0.10 - - - - - - - -12,094 -1.00 1,209,357 MS
Missouri 10 1,798,912 64.05 10 1,009,693 35.95 - - - - - - - - - - 789,219 28.10 2,808,605 MO
Montana 3 293,068 58.95 3 201,693 40.57 - 945 0.19 - 895 0.18 - 546 0.12 - 91,375 18.38 497,147 MT
Nebraska 5 441,148 52.61 4 403,079 47.39 1 - - - - - - - - - 38,069 5.22 844,227 NE
Nevada 6 659,251 58.58 6 466,134 41.42 - - - - - - - - - - 193,117 17.16 1,125,385 NV
New Hampshire 4 475,531 63.89 4 268,765 36.11 - - - - - - - - - - 206,766 27.78 744,296 NH
New Jersey 14 2,541,762 65.61 14 1,311,752 33.86 - 11,235 0.29 - 9,297 0.24 - - - - 1,230,010 31.75 3,874,046 NJ
New Mexico 5 472,765 59.22 5 321,244 40.24 - 2,954 0.37 - - - - 1,356 0.17 - 151,521 18.98 798,319 NM
New York 29 5,293,828 68.56 29 2,417,587 31.31 - 6,177 0.08 - 3,861 0.04 - - - - 2,876,241 37.25 7,721,453 NY
North Carolina 15 2,662,388 56.15 15 2,079,176 43.85 - - - - - - - - - - 583,212 12.30 4,741,564 NC
North Dakota 3 199,625 57.97 3 144,217 41.88 - 310 0.09 - - - - 208 0.07 - 55,408 16.09 344,360 ND
Ohio 18 3,459,489 62.94 18 2,036,998 37.06 - - - - - - - - - - 1,422,491 25.88 5,496,487 OH
Oklahoma 7 810,043 55.75 7 642,949 44.25 - - - - - - - - - - 167,094 11.50 1,452,992 OK
Oregon 7 1,275,251 63.72 7 719,680 35.96 - 2,402 0.12 - 3,202 0.16 - 600 0.03 - 555,671 27.76 2,001,336 OR
Pennsylvania 20 4,002,628 64.92 20 2,139,421 34.70 - 13,564 0.22 6,782 0.11 - 2,466 0.04 - 1,863,207 30.22 6,165,478 PA
Rhode Island 4 375,353 80.87 4 88,791 19.13 - - - - - - - - - - 286,562 61.74 464,144 RI
South Carolina 9 927,225 44.09 - 1,175,592 55.90 9 - - - - - - 210 0.01 - -248,367 -11.81 2,103,027 SC
South Dakota 3 205,809 55.61 3 164,284 44.39 - - - - - - - - - - 41,525 11.22 370,093 SD
Tennessee 11 1,391,955 55.50 11 1,115,821 44.49 - - - - - - - 251 0.01 - 276,134 11.01 2,508,027 TN
Texas 38 5,679,314 63.32 38 3,272,871 36.49 - - - - - - - 17,041 0.19 - 2,406,443 26.83 8,969,226 TX
Utah 6 620,702 54.86 6 510,728 45.14 - - - - - - - - - - 109,974 9.73 1,131,430 UT
Vermont 3 208,889 66.30 3 106,146 33.69 - - - - 32 0.01 - - - - 102,743 32.61 315,067 VT
Virginia 13 2,133,371 53.54 13 1,840,103 46.18 - 11,157 0.28 - - - - - - - 293,268 7.36 3,984,631 VA
Washington 12 2,055,542 61.97 12 1,239,561 37.37 - 20,566 0.62 1,350 0.04 - - - - 815,981 24.60 3,317,019 WA
West Virginia 5 485,379 67.94 5 229,044 32.06 - - - - - - - - - - 256,335 35.88 714,423 WV
Wisconsin 10 1,847,892 62.09 10 1,123,199 37.74 - 2,976 0.10 - 2,083 0.07 - - - - 724,693 24.35 2,976,150 WI
Wyoming 3 144,708 56.56 3 111,141 43.44 - - - - - - - - - - 33,567 13.12 255,849 WY
TOTALS: 538 83,436,593 61.05 497 53,006,195 38.78 41 138,546 0.10 - 55,825 0.04 - 29,190 0.02 - 30,430,398 22.27 136,669,237 US
Maine and Nebraska district results

Maine and Nebraska each allow for their electoral votes to be split between candidates. In both states, two electoral votes are awarded to the winner of the statewide race and one electoral vote is awarded to the winner of each congressional district. The following table records the official presidential vote tallies for Maine and Nebraska's congressional districts.

District EV Ferguson % Pryor % Other % Margin % Total
Maine's 1st congressional district 1 285,452 72.05% 110,501 27.89% 257 0.06% 174,951 44.16% 396,210
Maine's 2nd congressional district 1 229,122 65.14% 122,403 34.80% 192 0.06% 106,719 30.34% 351,717
Nebraska's 1st congressional district 1 156,323 55.52% 125,239 44.48% 31,084 11.04% 281,562
Nebraska's 2nd congressional district 1 155,437 53.16% 136,934 46.84% 18,503 6.32% 292,371
Nebraska's 3rd congressional district 1 129,388 47.87% 140,906 52.13% -11,518 -4.26% 270,294

Close states

Margin of victory less than 5% (39 electoral votes):

  1. Mississippi, 1.00%
  2. Idaho, 1.84%
  3. Florida, 2.30%

Margin of victory over 5%, but less than 10% (46 electoral votes):

  1. Nebraska, 5.22%
  2. Virginia, 7.36%
  3. Georgia, 8.25%
  4. Kansas, 9.03%
  5. Utah, 9.73%

Tipping point:

  1. Texas, 26.83%

Statistics

Counties with Highest Percent of Vote (Democratic)

  1. Kusilvak Census Area, Alaska 97.00%
  2. Elliott County, Kentucky 94.13%
  3. Oglala Lakota County, South Dakota 93.52%
  4. Jefferson County, Mississippi 93.16%
  5. District of Columbia, DC 92.46%

Counties with Highest Percent of Vote (Republican)

  1. Dawson County, Georgia 84.89%
  2. Banks County, Georgia 83.85%
  3. Holmes County, Florida 83.50%
  4. Forsyth County, Georgia 82.94%
  5. Blount County, Alabama 82.63%

Ballot access

Presidential ticket Party Ballot access Votes
Ferguson / Klobuchar Democratic 50+DC 83,436,593
Pryor / Ryan Republican 50+DC 53,006,195
Sloan / Harris Libertarian 26 138,546
Stein / Baraka Green 20 55,825
Castle / Bradley Constitution 17 29,190

Voter demographics

2016 presidential election by demographic subgroup (Edison Exit Polling)
Demographic subgroup Ferguson Pryor % of
total vote
Total vote 61 39 100
Ideology
Liberals 97 3 26
Moderates 66 34 39
Conservatives 29 71 35
Party
Democrats 95 5 37
Republicans 20 80 33
Independents 65 35 31
Gender
Men 60 40 47
Women 62 38 53
Marital status
Married 56 44 59
Unmarried 69 31 41
Race/ethnicity
White 53 47 74
Black 95 5 12
Asian 76 24 3
Other 68 32 2
Hispanic (of any race) 77 23 9
Gender by race/ethnicity
White men 52 48 34
White women 54 46 37
Black men 94 6 5
Black women 96 4 7
All other races 74 26 14
Religion
Protestant or Other Christian 52 48 51
Catholic 60 40 23
Mormon 52 48 1
Jewish 79 21 3
Other religion 84 16 7
None 80 20 15
Religious service attendance
Weekly or more 51 49 33
Monthly 61 39 16
A few times a year 67 33 29
Never 69 31 22
White evangelical or born-again Christian
White evangelical or born-again Christian 32 68 26
Everyone else 71 29 74
Age
18–29 years old 68 32 19
30–44 years old 64 36 25
45-64 years old 57 43 40
65 and older 59 41 16
Age by race
Whites 18–29 years old 64 36 12
Whites 30–44 years old 51 49 16
Whites 45–64 years old 52 48 30
Whites 65 and older 50 50 16
Blacks 18–29 years old 93 7 3
Blacks 30–44 years old 96 4 4
Blacks 45–64 years old 96 4 4
Blacks 65 and older 94 6 1
Others 74 26 14
Sexual orientation
LGBT 78 22 5
Heterosexual 60 40 95
First time voter
First time voter 69 31 10
Everyone else 60 40 90
Education
High school or less 66 34 18
Some college education 59 41 32
College graduate 58 42 32
Postgraduate education 66 34 18
Family income
Under $50,000 67 33 36
$50,000-100,000 59 41 30
Over $100,000 57 43 34
Union households
Union 73 27 18
Non-union 59 41 82
Military service
Veterans 55 45 13
Non-veterans 62 38 87
Region
Northeast 68 32 19
Midwest 63 37 23
South 55 45 37
West 63 37 21
Community size
Cities (population 50,000 and above) 66 34 34
Suburbs 59 41 49
Rural areas 57 43 17

Explanatory notes

  1. No third-party votes were recorded in Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming
  2. Pryor received one electoral vote from Nebraska's 3rd congressional district, as Nebraska is one of two states (along with Maine) that allocates electoral votes by congressional district; Ferguson won the state's other four electoral votes
  3. Pryor failed to carry a single county in Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont
  4. Pryor carried only one county in Arizona (Graham), California (Sutter), and Oregon (Malheur)
  5. Pryor carried only two counties in Minnesota (Rock and Pipestone)
  6. Romney did not win any counties in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, or Hawaii in 2012, and Alabama was the only state which swung to Pryor
  7. These counties were in Illinois (Carroll and Ogle), Kentucky (Leslie and Owsley), and Virginia (Manassas)
  8. This included three counties last carried by Hubert Humphrey in 1968; 56 counties last carried by Jimmy Carter in either 1976 or 1980; four counties last carried by Michael Dukakis in 1988; and one county last carried by Mario Cuomo in 1996
  9. Arkansas was the other; Pryor got 61.64% in Alabama and 43.41% in Arkansas, compared to Romney's 59.17% and 43.06%
  10. These states were Arkansas, Delaware, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia
  11. These were Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Virginia
  12. These were Idaho and Utah
  13. These were Kansas and Nebraska
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