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2016 Election Results Infobox.PNG

The United States presidential election of 2016 was the 58th quadrennial presidential election. It was held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016. Incumbent Democratic President William C. Rutherford defeated Thomas P. Leach, the Republican nominee. With 62.2% of the popular vote, Rutherford won the highest share of the popular vote of any candidate since the uncontested 1820 election.

Rutherford had become President in January 2013, defeating his Republican opponent, President Mitt Romney, in the midst of the Great Recession and of military conflicts in Syria, Iraq, and Yemen. Rutherford, who had successfully revived economic growth and brought a close to these conflicts, was renominated without opposition in 2016. Rutherford ran alongside Vice President Carlotta Sanchez of California. Senator Thomas P. Leach of Arizona, one of the most conservative Republicans in the Senate, defeated moderate Governor Charlie Baker of Massachusetts at the 2016 Republican National Convention.

Rutherford championed his passage of the Criminal Justice Reform Act, and his campaign advocated a series of new economic programs known as the New Destiny. Leach called for the elimination of federal programs and spending, and he voted against the Criminal Justice Reform Act. Democrats successfully portrayed Leach as a dangerous extremist, most famously in the "Confessions" television advertisement. The Republican Party was badly divided between its moderate and conservative factions, with Baker and other moderate party leaders refusing to support Leach. Rutherford led by wide margins in all opinion polls throughout the entire campaign.

Rutherford carried 48 states and the District of Columbia, earning the second-highest number of electoral votes for a presidential candidate in modern times. Leach won two states in the Deep South-Alabama and Mississippi, which had, due to lingering backlash over the Civil Rights Movement and growing conservatism, become the most Republican states in that region. He lost several other Republican strongholds throughout the remainder of the country. Rutherford's landslide victory coincided with the defeat of many conservative Republican Congressmen, and the subsequent 115th Congress would pass major legislation such as the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Reform Act of 2017 and the Federal Education Reform Act of 2018. Leach's unsuccessful bid influenced the modern conservative movement and the long-time realignment within the Republican Party, culminating in the 2024 presidential victory of Brian Sandoval.

Nominations[]

Democratic Party[]

Primaries[]

With an incumbent President running for re-election against token opposition, the race for the Democratic nomination was largely uneventful. The nomination process consisted of primaries and caucuses, held by the 50 states, as well as Guam, Puerto Rico, Washington D.C., U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and Democrats Abroad. Additionally, high-ranking party members known as superdelegates each received one vote in the convention. President Rutherford won 97% of the total primary vote and cemented his status as the Democratic presumptive nominee on April 3, 2016, by securing the minimum number of pledged delegates to obtain the nomination.

Candidates[]

U.S. Democratic Party logo (transparent).png
Democratic Party ticket, 2016
William Rutherford Carlotta Sanchez
for President for Vice President
William Rutherford.jpg
Loretta Sanchez.jpg
President of the United States
(2013-2021)
Vice President of the United States
(2013-2021)

Republican Party[]

Primaries[]

In 2016, the Republican Party (GOP) was badly divided between its conservative and moderate-liberal factions. Former Vice President Tim Pawlenty, who had been on the losing ticket with former President Mitt Romney in the 2012 presidential election, decided not to run. Pawlenty, a moderate with ties to both wings of the GOP, decided that a run at this stage would not be a wise move. In his absence, the Party's two factions engaged in an all-out civil war for the nomination. Thomas P. Leach, a Senator from Arizona, was the standard-bearer of the conservatives. By 2016, the conservatives had established their main base in the South and West, and had shifted to strongly advocating a low-tax, small federal government which supported individual rights and business interests, while opposing social welfare programs. Many conservatives labeled members of the moderate wing as "RINOS", believing that they were little different from the Democrats in their philosophy and their approach to governance. Leach's primary opponent for the Republican nomination was Charlie Baker, Governor of Massachusetts and leader of the Party's moderate faction.

Initially, Baker was considered the front-runner, ahead of Leach. However, a scandal emerged in 2015 regarding Governor Baker's son, Andrew, who was accused of sexual assault and hazing. Baker's subsequent wavering over the affair, and the negative publicity which it brought, seriously damaged his chances at the nomination. Social conservatives and female voters within the GOP, outraged by the affair, shifted their support to Leach. Although Baker managed to win the New Hampshire primary, Leach built up his momentum through triumphs in the Iowa caucus and the South Carolina primary. The more minor candidates, including former Senator and Governor Lincoln Chaffee of Rhode Island, former Governor Gary Johnson of New Mexico, Senator Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin, Senator Thomas Kean, Jr. of New Jersey, Senator Lindsay Graham of South Carolina, former Governor Buddy Roemer of Louisiana, former Ambassador Jon Huntsman of Utah, and businesswoman Carly Fiorina of California, dropped out as they failed to increase their delegate counts. Leach won the Nevada caucuses by a significant margin. He subsequently swept most of the Super Tuesday primaries, with Baker obtaining victories only in Colorado, his home state of Massachusetts, Minnesota, Vermont, and Virginia. Leach continued his path through victories in Kentucky and Louisiana, and nearly upset Baker in Maine. Baker kept afloat with wins in Puerto Rico, Hawaii, Michigan, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia. On March 15, he won the Illinois and Ohio primaries, but Leach scored a victory in Florida and defeated him handily in Missouri and North Carolina.

Baker lost out to Leach in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Nebraska, and West Virginia, but won contests in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Rhode Island, and New York. But his upset loss in the California primary on June 7, along with corresponding defeats in Montana, New Mexico, and South Dakota, when compounded with Leach's sweep of Arizona, Utah, Idaho, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Kansas, and all of the remaining states of the South, sealed his fate. He was finally eliminated as a potential nominee. GOP moderates and liberals begged former Vice President Pawlenty to put his name before the party Convention, but he refused. Thus, on July 18, 2016, Leach was formally nominated at the Republican National Convention in Salt Lake City, Utah. Leach subsequently selected little-known Representative Todd Rokita of Indiana, then Chairman of the Republican National Committee, as his running mate. When asked why he did so, the Senator responded that it was because he knew Rokita would "drive President Rutherford crazy."

Candidates[]

Republican Party Logo.png
Republican Party ticket, 2016
Thomas Leach Todd Rokita
for President for Vice President
Thomas P. Leach.jpg
Todd Rokita.jpg
U.S. Senator from Arizona
(2011-2017)
U.S. Representative from Indiana
(2011-2017)

Withdrawn candidates[]

  • Charlie Baker, Governor of Massachusetts (ended active campaigning on June 7, 2016; declined to endorse a candidate)
  • Thomas Kean, Jr., Senator from New Jersey (withdrew on February 24, 2016; declined to endorse a candidate)
  • Tommy Thompson, Senator from Wisconsin (withdrew on March 5, 2016; declined to endorse a candidate)
  • Lincoln Chaffee, former Governor of Rhode Island (withdrew on March 15, 2016; endorsed William Weld)
  • Gary Johnson, former Governor of New Mexico (withdrew on February 9, 2016; endorsed first Charlie Baker, then William Weld, after Baker ended active campaigning)
  • Buddy Roemer, former Governor of Louisiana (withdrew on March 5, 2016; endorsed William Weld)
  • Lindsay Graham, Senator from South Carolina (withdrew on February 23, 2016; declined to endorse a candidate)
  • Jon Huntsman, former U.S. Ambassador from Utah (withdrew on February 9, 2016; endorsed first Charlie Baker, then President Rutherford)
  • Carly Fiorina, former CEO of Hewlett-Packard (withdrew on February 23, 2016; declined to endorse a candidate)

Third parties and other nominations[]

Three other parties nominated candidates that had ballot access or write-in access to at least 270 electoral votes, the minimum number of votes needed in the 2016 election to win the Presidency through a majority of the Electoral College.

Libertarian Party[]

  • William Weld, former Governor of Massachusetts. Vice-presidential nominee: Aubrey Dunn, Jr., Commissioner of Public Lands, from New Mexico.

Green Party[]

  • Jill Stein, medical doctor from Massachusetts. Vice-presidential nominee: Ajamu Baraka, social activist, from Illinois.

Constitution Party[]

  • Darrell Castle, attorney from Tennessee. Vice-presidential nominee: Scott Bradley, university administrator, from Utah.

Candidates gallery[]

General election[]

Campaign[]

Although Leach had been successful in rallying conservatives, he was unable to broaden his base of support for the general election. Shortly before the Republican Convention, he had alienated moderate Republicans by his vote against the bipartisan Criminal Justice Reform Act of 2016, which Rutherford championed and signed into law. Leach said that he was worried about the Act's effects on law enforcement agencies, and that he believed it to be unconstitutional. Leach's vote against the legislation helped cause African-Americans, Hispanics, and Asians to overwhelmingly support Rutherford. Leach had previously voted in favor of the 2014 and 2015 Drug Policy Reconciliation Acts, but only after proposing "restrictive amendments" to them. He was also infamous for speaking "off the cuff" at times, and many of his former statements were given wide publicity by the Democrats. In the early 2010s, Leach had called the Lugar administration a "Great Society in disguise", and the former President never fully forgave him or offered his full support in the election.

In December 2015, Leach told a news conference that he wished "we could cut out all the cities and replace them with something else", a remark which indicated his dislike of the liberal social and economic policies associated with those parts of the country. That comment came back to haunt him, in the form of a Rutherford television commercial, as did remarks about making Social Security voluntary, privatizing the Tennessee Valley Authority, and slashing Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps, and farm subsidies. In his most famous verbal gaffe, Leach joked that we should "lob a few bombs" in the direction of Iran and North Korea.

Leach was also hurt by the reluctance of many prominent moderate Republicans to support him. Governors Charlie Baker of Massachusetts and Larry Hogan of Maryland refused to endorse Leach and did not campaign for him. On the other hand, former Vice President Tim Pawlenty and Governor John Kasich of Ohio loyally supported the GOP ticket and campaigned for Leach, although Pawlenty did not entirely agree with Leach's political stances and said that it would be a "tragedy" if Leach's platform were not "challenged and repudiated" by the Republicans. Several prominent Republican newspapers, including The New Hampshire Union-Leader, The Houston Chronicle, The Dallas Morning News, The Columbus Dispatch, The San Diego Union-Dispatch, The Detroit News, The Chicago Tribune, and The Cincinnati Enquirer, supported Rutherford in the general election, the first time they had endorsed a Democrat in many decades. Some moderates even formed a "Republicans for Rutherford" organization, although most prominent GOP politicians avoided being associated with it.

Lugar's strong backing could have been an asset to the Leach campaign, but its absence was clearly noted. When questioned about the political capabilities of the former President's grandson Richard in July 2016, Leach replied, "One Lugar a generation is enough." However, Lugar did not openly repudiate Leach and made one television commercial for Leach's campaign.

Debates[]

The Commission on Presidential Debates held four debates during the last weeks of the campaign, three presidential and one vice-presidential. The major issues debated were the economy and jobs, the federal budget deficit, taxation and spending, the future of Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid, healthcare reform, education, social issues, immigration, and foreign policy.

Debate schedule:

  • Monday, September 26: The first presidential debate took place at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, moderated by Lester Holt.
  • Tuesday, October 4: The vice-presidential debate took place at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, moderated by Elaine Quijano.
  • Sunday, October 9: The second presidential debate took place at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, moderated by Anderson Cooper and Martha Raddatz.
  • Wednesday, October 19: The third presidential debate took place at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, in Las Vegas, Nevada, moderated by Chris Wallace.

An independent presidential debate featuring minor party candidates took place on Tuesday, October 25, at Notre Dame University in South Bend, Indiana. The debate was moderated by Ed Asner and Christina Tobin, and was organized by the Free & Equal Elections Foundation. The participants were William Weld (Libertarian), Jill Stein (Green), and Darrell Castle (Constitution). A second debate between Stein and Weld took place on Tuesday, November 1, 2016, at the Palomar Hotel in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was hosted by Democracy Now and moderated by Thom Hartman and Christina Tobin.

Ads and slogans[]

Rutherford positioned himself as a moderate and succeeded in portraying Leach as an extremist. Leach had a habit of making blunt statements about war, nuclear weapons, and economics that could be turned against him. Most famously, the Rutherford campaign broadcast a television commercial in September 2016, dubbed Nuclear Armageddon, which depicted the devastating effects of nuclear war, implied to result from a "rushed" military action on Leach's orders. Confessions of American Voters, another Rutherford ad, depicted various Americans expressing their disgust with Leach's views on healthcare, education, agriculture, and foreign policy, and their concerns about his "brashness" and "impulse of action." Voters increasingly viewed Leach as a right-wing fringe candidate. His slogan "You know he's straight" was successfully parodied by the Rutherford campaign into "You know he's mad", "You know he's far out", and "You know he's delusional."

The Rutherford campaign's greatest concern may have been voter complacency leading to low turnout in key states. To counter this, all of Rutherford's broadcast ads concluded with the line: "Vote for President Rutherford on November 3. America cannot afford the consequences if you do not." The Democratic campaign used two other slogans, "Move forward with WCR" and "Americans for WCR."

The election campaign was disrupted for a week by the death of former President John Glenn on October 20, 2016, because it was considered disrespectful to be campaigning during a time of mourning. Glenn died of natural causes. He had been U.S. President from 1981 to 1989. Both major candidates attended his funeral.

Rutherford led in all opinion polls by huge margins throughout the entire campaign.

Results[]

The election was held on November 8, 2016. Rutherford beat Leach in the general election, winning over 62% of the popular vote, the highest percentage since the popular vote first became widespread in 1824. In the end, Leach won only two states in the Deep South-Alabama and Mississippi-which had become Republican strongholds in recent decades. He also earned the electoral vote from Nebraska's 3rd congressional district. He became the first major-party presidential nominee since George McGovern in 1972 to lose his home state, Arizona, which he lost by a margin of just over 2%. Leach's 16 electoral votes were the fewest for any presidential candidate in history since 1936, when Alf Landon had earned just eight electoral votes against Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Election results by county.

  William Rutherford
  Thomas Leach

2016 Presidential Election, Results by Congressional District.

The 2016 election marked a significant milestone for the Democratic Party in the electoral sense. With this victory, Rutherford became the first Democrat to win the states of Wyoming, Utah, and Idaho since Lyndon Johnson in 1964, and only the second Democrat, following John Glenn in 1984, to carry Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska since Johnson. He was also only the third Democrat in history, following Johnson and Glenn, to win the state of Alaska.

Of the 3,142 counties, parishes, and independent cities making returns, Rutherford won in 2,561 (81.51%) while Leach carried 581 (18.49%).

The Rutherford landslide defeated many conservative Republican congressmen, giving him a more progressive majority with which to enact his legislative agenda.

This is the last election prior to the admission of Puerto Rico to the Union.

The Rutherford campaign broke two prior electoral records previously held by Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard Nixon: the largest share of the popular vote under the current Democratic/Republican competition (Johnson won 61.1% nationwide, Rutherford 62.2%), and the largest number of congressional districts carried by a single presidential candidate (Rutherford won 397 districts, Nixon 378). Rutherford retains the record for the highest percentage of the popular vote as of the 2040 election.


Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral
vote
Running mate
Count Percentage Vice-presidential candidate Home state Electoral vote
William Casey Rutherford (Incumbent) Democratic Texas 85,065,810 62.24% 522 Carlotta Sanchez California 522
Thomas Pirchard Leach Republican Arizona 51,362,803 37.58% 16 Todd Rokita Indiana 16
William Weld Libertarian Massachusetts 136,669 0.10% 0 Aubrey Dunn, Jr. New Mexico 0
Jill Stein Green Massachusetts 73,776 0.05% 0 Ajamu Baraka Illinois 0
Darrell Castle Constitution Tennessee 27,334 0.02% 0 Scott Bradley Utah 0
Other 13,667 0.01% Other
Total 136,669,276 100% 538 538
Needed to win 270 270
Popular vote
Rutherford
  
62.24%
Leach
  
37.58%
Others
  
0.18%
Electoral vote
Rutherford
  
97.02%
Leach
  
2.98%

Geography of results[]

United States presidential election results by state (with overall percentages), 2016.png

Cartographic gallery[]

Results by state[]

States/districts won by Rutherford/Sanchez
States/districts won by Leach/Rokita
William Casey Rutherford
Democratic
Thomas Pirchard Leach
Republican
Margin State Total
State electoral
votes
# % electoral
votes
# % electoral
votes
# % #
Alabama 9 1,009,663 47.55 - 1,113,708 52.45 9 -104,045 -4.90 2,123,372 AL
Alaska 3 209,995 65.91 3 108,613 34.09 - 101,382 31.82 318,608 AK
Arizona 11 1,316,174 51.15 11 1,256,991 48.85 - 59,183 2.30 2,573,165 AZ
Arkansas 6 633,833 56.06 6 490,808 43.41 - 143,025 12.66 1,130,635 AR
California 55 9,494,578 66.95 55 4,687,017 33.05 - 4,821,742 33.90 14,181,595 CA
Colorado 9 1,826,066 65.68 9 954,181 34.32 - 871,885 31.36 2,780,247 CO
Connecticut 7 1,115,420 67.81 7 527,855 32.09 - 587,565 35.72 1,644,920 CT
Delaware 3 308,451 69.50 3 135,263 30.50 - 173,188 39.00 443,814 DE
D.C. 3 287,798 92.46 3 20,326 6.53 - 267,472 85.93 311,268 DC
Florida 29 5,323,264 56.51 29 4,095,833 43.48 - 1,227,431 13.03 9,420,039 FL
Georgia 16 2,394,774 58.20 16 1,719,958 41.80 - 674,816 16.40 4,114,732 GA
Hawaii 4 337,831 78.76 4 91,106 21.24 - 246,725 57.52 428,937 HI
Idaho 4 351,478 50.92 4 338,777 49.08 - 12,701 1.83 690,255 ID
Illinois 20 3,602,551 65.07 20 1,933,873 34.93 - 1,668,678 30.14 5,536,424 IL
Indiana 11 1,531,029 55.98 11 1,191,348 43.56 - 339,681 12.42 2,734,958 IN
Iowa 6 981,275 62.66 6 583,503 37.26 - 397,772 25.40 1,566,031 IA
Kansas 6 640,643 54.09 6 533,692 45.06 - 106,951 9.03 1,184,402 KS
Kentucky 8 1,231,648 64.01 8 685,959 35.65 - 545,689 28.36 1,924,149 KY
Louisiana 8 1,138,490 56.11 8 890,542 43.89 - 247,948 12.22 2,029,032 LA
Maine 4 514,574 68.80 4 232,904 31.14 - 281,670 37.66 747,927 ME
Maryland 10 1,821,013 65.47 10 960,433 34.53 - 860,580 30.94 2,781,446 MD
Massachusetts 11 2,533,353 76.19 11 779,391 23.44 - 1,753,962 52.75 3,325,046 MA
Michigan 16 3,201,122 66.70 16 1,588,563 33.10 - 1,612,537 33.60 4,799,284 MI
Minnesota 10 1,920,902 65.23 10 975,322 33.12 - 975,188 32.11 2,944,813 MN
Mississippi 6 490,515 40.56 - 718,842 59.44 6 -228,327 -18.88 1,209,357 MS
Missouri 10 1,798,912 64.05 10 1,001,268 35.95 - 797,644 28.10 2,808,605 MO
Montana 3 293,068 58.95 3 201,693 40.57 - 91,375 18.38 497,147 MT
Nebraska 5 441,148 52.61 4 400,079 47.39 1 41,069 5.22 844,227 NE
Nevada 6 659,251 58.58 6 466,134 41.42 - 193,117 17.16 1,125,385 NV
New Hampshire 4 491,831 66.08 4 250,009 33.59 - 241,822 32.49 744,296 NH
New Jersey 14 2,541,762 65.61 14 1,311,752 33.86 - 1,230,010 31.75 3,874,046 NJ
New Mexico 5 549,403 68.82 5 248,916 31.18 - 300,487 37.64 798,319 NM
New York 29 5,293,828 68.56 29 2,417,587 31.31 - 2,876,241 37.25 7,721,453 NY
North Carolina 15 2,662,388 56.15 15 2,079,176 43.85 - 583,212 12.30 4,741,564 NC
North Dakota 3 199,625 57.97 3 142,217 41.88 - 57,408 16.09 344,360 ND
Ohio 18 3,459,489 62.94 18 2,036,998 37.06 - 1,422,491 25.88 5,496,487 OH
Oklahoma 7 810,043 55.75 7 642,949 44.25 - 167,094 11.50 1,452,992 OK
Oregon 7 1,275,351 63.72 7 719,680 35.96 - 555,671 27.76 2,001,336 OR
Pennsylvania 20 4,002,628 64.92 20 2,139,421 34.70 - 1,863,207 30.22 6,165,478 PA
Rhode Island 4 375,353 80.87 4 88,790 19.13 - 286,563 61.74 464,144 RI
South Carolina 9 1,181,270 56.17 9 907,036 43.13 - 274,234 13.04 2,103,027 SC
South Dakota 3 205,809 55.61 3 164,284 44.39 - 41,525 11.22 370,093 SD
Tennessee 11 1,391,955 55.50 11 1,115,821 44.49 - 276,134 11.01 2,508,027 TN
Texas 38 5,679,314 63.32 38 3,272,871 36.49 - 2,406,443 26.83 8,969,226 TX
Utah 6 620,702 54.86 6 510,728 45.14 - 109,974 9.73 1,131,430 UT
Vermont 3 227,541 72.22 3 87,526 27.78 - 140,015 44.44 315,067 VT
Virginia 13 2,133,371 53.54 13 1,840,103 46.18 - 293,268 7.36 3,984,631 VA
Washington 12 2,077,449 62.63 12 1,239,570 37.37 - 837,879 25.26 3,317,019 WA
West Virginia 5 485,379 67.94 5 229,044 32.06 - 256,335 35.88 714,423 WV
Wisconsin 10 1,847,892 62.09 10 1,123,199 37.74 - 724,693 24.35 2,976,150 WI
Wyoming 3 144,708 56.56 3 111,141 43.44 - 33,567 13.12 255,849 WY
TOTALS: 538 85,065,810 62.24 522 51,362,803 37.58 16 33,703,007 24.66 136,669,276 US

Close states[]

Margin of victory less than 5% (24 electoral votes):

  1. Idaho, 1.83%
  2. Arizona, 2.30%
  3. Alabama, 4.90%

Margin of victory over 5%, but less than 10% (30 electoral votes):

  1. Nebraska, 5.22%
  2. Virginia, 7.36%
  3. Kansas, 9.03%
  4. Utah, 9.73%

State margins and county information[]

States with the Smallest Margin of Victory:

State EV Total Vote % Margin Margin Rutherford Leach
Idaho 4 690,255 1.83% 12,701 50.92% 49.08%
Arizona 11 2,573,165 2.30% 59,183 51.15% 48.85%
Alabama 9 2,173,372 4.90% 104,045 47.55% 52.45%
Nebraska 5 844,227 5.22% 41,069 52.61% 47.39%
Virginia 13 3,984,631 7.36% 293,268 53.54% 46.18%
Kansas 6 1,184,402 9.03% 106,951 54.09% 45.06%
Utah 6 1,131,430 9.73% 109,974 54.86% 45.14%
Tennessee 11 1,391,955 11.01% 276,134 55.50% 44.49%
South Dakota 3 370,093 11.22% 41,525 55.61% 44.39%
Oklahoma 7 1,452,992 11.50% 167,094 55.75% 44.25%
Louisiana 8 2,029,032 12.22% 247,948 56.11% 43.89%

States with the Largest Margin of Victory:

State EV Total Vote % Margin Margin Rutherford Leach
District of Columbia 3 311,268 85.93% 267,472 92.46% 6.53%
Rhode Island 4 464,144 61.74% 286,563 80.87% 19.13%
Hawaii 4 428,937 57.52% 246,725 78.76% 21.24%
Massachusetts 11 3,325,046 52.75% 1,753,962 76.19% 23.44%
Vermont 3 315,067 44.44% 140,015 72.22% 27.78%
Delaware 3 443,814 39.00% 173,188 69.50% 30.50%
Maine 4 747,927 37.66% 281,670 68.80% 31.14%
New Mexico 5 798,319 37.64% 300,487 68.82% 31.18%
New York 29 7,721,453 37.25% 2,876,241 68.56% 31.31%
West Virginia 5 714,423 35.88% 256,335 67.94% 32.06%

States with Highest Percent of Vote:

Rutherford Percentage Leach Percentage
District of Columbia 92.46% Mississippi 59.44%
Rhode Island 80.87% Alabama 52.45%
Hawaii 78.76% Idaho 49.08%
Massachusetts 76.19% Arizona 48.85%
Vermont 72.22% Nebraska 47.39%

States with Lowest Percent of Vote:

Rutherford Percentage Leach Percentage
Mississippi 40.56% District of Columbia 6.53%
Alabama 47.55% Rhode Island 19.13%
Idaho 50.92% Hawaii 21.24%
Arizona 51.15% Massachusetts 23.44%
Nebraska 52.61% Vermont 27.78%

States with Largest Vote Swing:

Rutherford Swing Leach Swing
California 1,881,370 New York -545,878
New York 1,338,293 Massachusetts -473,461
Texas 1,185,171 New Jersey -395,545
Florida 1,122,613 Michigan -344,035
Pennsylvania 825,451 Missouri -325,832

States with Largest Vote Swing Percentage:

State Percentage
Alaska 45.81%
Utah 38.52%
Rhode Island 32.30%
Massachusetts 32.08%
Vermont 29.91%

States with Largest Change in Total Votes:

State Increasing State Decreasing
California 1,143,048 Wisconsin -92,284
Texas 975,375 Ohio -84,360
Florida 945,860 Mississippi -76,227
New York 640,294 Iowa -16,249
Pennsylvania 411,808 Hawaii -5,760

State Ranks:

Rank Rutherford Leach
1 49 2
2 2 49

County Ranks:

Rank Rutherford Leach
1 2,561 581
2 581 2,561

Congressional District Ranks:

Rank Rutherford Leach
1 397 38
2 38 397

Counties with Highest Percent of Vote:

Rutherford Percentage Leach Percentage
District of Columbia, DC 92.46% Lamar, MS 80.20%
Duval, TX 92.46% Rankin, MS 79.89%
Knott, KY 90.61% Smith, MS 78.29%
Webb, TX 90.05% George, MS 77.80%
Aleutians West, AK 90.02% Pearl River, MS 76.40%

Counties with Lowest Percent of Vote:

Rutherford Percentage Leach Percentage
Lamar, MS 19.80% District of Columbia, DC 6.53%
Rankin, MS 20.11% Duval, TX 7.47%
Smith, MS 21.71% Knott, KY 9.19%
George, MS 22.20% Webb, TX 9.82%
Pearl River, MS 23.60% Aleutians West, AK 9.98%

Counties with Highest Number of Votes:

Rutherford Percentage Leach Percentage
Los Angeles, CA 2,463,699 Los Angeles, CA 970,609
Cook, IL 1,550,641 Maricopa, AZ 859,869
San Diego, CA 847,504 Cook, IL 642,985
Harris, TX 739,789 Harris, TX 570,574
Maricopa, AZ 726,880 Orange, CA 539,381
Miami-Dade, FL 676,178 San Diego, CA 458,896
Orange, CA 658,140 King, WA 398,859
Wayne, MI 646,040 Riverside, CA 372,572
Brooklyn, NY 640,456 Dallas, TX 338,820
King, WA 629,591 Miami-Dade, FL 304,028

Counties with Lowest Number of Votes:

Rutherford Percentage Leach Percentage
Kalawao, HI 15 Kalawao, HI 5
Loving, TX 38 King, TX 25
McPherson, NE 92 Loving, TX 26
Arthur, NE 93 Kenedy, TX 39
Blaine, NE 118 Yakutat, AK 67
Loup, NE 128 Petroleum, MT 153
King, TX 134 Arthur, NE 179
Kenedy, TX 147 McPherson, NE 194
Petroleum, MT 169 Blaine, NE 198
Yakutat, AK 279 Loup, NE 254

Counties with Lowest Percent of Vote and Win:

Rutherford Percentage Leach Percentage
Charleston, SC 49.58% Halifax, VA 49.54%
Newton, AR 49.58% Graham, KS 49.64%
Stevens, KS 49.80% Logan, KS 49.82%
Whitley, KY 49.80% Johnson, KY 49.89%
La Grange, IN 49.95% Wayne, IN 49.93%

Counties with Highest Percent of Vote and Lose:

Rutherford Percentage Leach Percentage
Henrico, VA 49.99% Buffalo, NE 49.95%
Brantley, GA 49.98% Doddridge, WV 49.91%
Washington, VA 49.92% Boone, NE 49.84%
Harding, SD 49.90% Green Lake, WI 49.83%
Hancock, OH 49.90% Dickey, ND 49.81%

Results by demographic group[]

Voter demographics (2016)[]
2016 Presidential vote by demographic subgroup (two-party electorate)
Demographic subgroup Rutherford Leach % of
total vote
Total vote 62 38 100
Ideology
Liberals 96 4 26
Moderates 71 29 39
Conservatives 29 71 35
Party
Democrats 95 5 37
Republicans 21 79 32
Independents 66 34 31
Party by gender
Democratic men 93 7 14
Democratic women 96 4 23
Republican men 20 80 17
Republican women 22 78 16
Independent men 61 39 17
Independent women 71 29 14
Gender
Men 61 39 47
Women 64 36 53
Gender by marital status
Married men 58 42 29
Married women 62 38 30
Non-married men 62 38 18
Non-married women 66 34 23
Race/ethnicity
White 55 45 74
Black 94 6 12
Asian 73 27 3
Other 60 40 2
Hispanic 71 29 9
Gender by race/ethnicity
White men 53 47 34
White women 57 43 37
Black men 93 7 5
Black women 95 5 7
Latino men (of any race) 70 30 4
Latino women (of any race) 75 25 5
All other races 67 33 5
Religion
Protestant 55 45 27
Catholic 76 24 23
Mormon 52 48 1
Other Christian 56 44 24
Jewish 84 16 3
Other 58 42 7
None 63 37 15
Religious service attendance
Weekly or more 58 42 33
Monthly 61 39 16
A few times a year 66 34 29
Never 62 38 22
White evangelical or born-again Christian?
White evangelical or born-again Christian 52 48 26
Everyone else 66 34 74
Age
18–24 years old 71 29 10
25–29 years old 65 35 9
30–39 years old 63 37 17
40–49 years old 62 38 19
50–64 years old 60 40 30
65 and older 59 41 15
Age by race
Whites 18–29 years old 64 36 12
Whites 30–44 years old 56 44 17
Whites 45–64 years old 53 47 31
Whites 65 and older 51 49 14
Blacks 18–29 years old 92 8 2
Blacks 30–44 years old 95 5 4
Blacks 45–64 years old 94 6 5
Blacks 65 and older 94 6 1
Latinos 18–29 years old 79 21 1
Latinos 30–44 years old 76 24 3
Latinos 45–64 years old 70 30 4
Latinos 65 and older 70 30 1
Others 67 33 5
Sexual orientation
LGBT 92 8 5
Heterosexual 61 39 95
First time voter
First time voter 70 30 10
Everyone else 62 38 90
Education
High school or less 66 34 18
Some college education 63 37 32
College graduate 56 44 32
Postgraduate education 71 29 18
Education by race/ethnicity
White college graduates 52 48 39
White no college degree 58 42 35
Non-white college graduates 79 21 12
Non-white no college degree 84 16 14
Education by race/ethnicity/sex
White women with college degrees 52 48 21
White men with college degrees 52 48 18
White women without college degrees 59 41 18
White men without college degrees 57 43 17
Non-whites 82 18 26
Family income
Under $30,000 71 29 17
$30,000–49,999 69 31 19
$50,000–99,999 59 41 31
$100,000–199,999 56 44 24
$200,000–249,999 58 42 4
Over $250,000 58 42 6
Region
Northeast 70 30 19
Midwest 65 35 24
South 59 41 37
West 64 36 21
Union households
Union 73 27 18
Non-union 60 40 82
Military service
Veterans 56 44 13
Non-veterans 64 36 87
Community size
Cities (population 50,000 and above) 70 30 34
Suburbs 59 41 49
Rural areas 64 36 17

Electoral records[]

  • This was the last election before the admission of Puerto Rico into the Union. It would also be the last time that there would be 538 electoral votes.
  • This was the first time since 1964 that the states of Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming voted Democratic, and the first time since 1984 that the states of Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma did so.
  • This was the first time since 1844 that Boone County, Illinois voted Democratic, the first time since 1852 that DuPage, McHenry, and Lee Counties, Illinois voted Democratic, and the first time ever that Carroll, Edwards, and Ogle Counties, Illinois did so. It was also the first time since 1912 that Carroll County, New Hampshire voted Democratic.
  • Rutherford won every county in twelve states: Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont.
  • 2016 was the first election since 1924 in which every county in New England voted for a single presidential candidate.
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